American Eagle AE 750 SS SuperSport (1970)

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
Does your tank have the original style big cap and luggage rack? Cost with shipping to USA?
No luggage rack but there is a cap.

I'll see how much shipping to the US would be and quote you a price by pm.
I did say that it was for a 1st series frame didn't I?

Paul
 

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
I'm assuming he's talking about one of these - the first pic, black. The second S and third SF tanks fit just fine onto the S frame 26xx underneath them all.

Agreed that S and GT tanks not easily interchangeable as the GT frame is wider by about one inch (=25.4mm Paul!) at the rear of the tank.
There was an exchange on the Laverdamania forum about the S and first type SF tank. I cannot access that forum any more since I was recently banned for not marching in step.

There are differences between the S and first type SF tanks. They are not strictly interchangeable, one sitting higher than the other.

By first type SF tank, I mean the camel back tank like the S but with a central opening.

Paul
 

arancia

Full member
Location
Arizona, USA
OK, I'll try to find that discussion in Laverdamania.

I sat the two "camelback" tanks side by side, one with original offset twist cap "S" and one with flip cap "SF", the only differences I can see are the caps and the lack of the air bleed pipe on the later tank, no mount differences or significant dimension changes. Photos here show them on the "wrong" frames, the SF tank on the S 26xx frame and the S tank on the 15xxx SF frame - no problems, the frames' differences don't seem to affect the fit of the tanks though clearly this does not consider clearance to the motor, carbs and other stuff under the tank or fit with the seat and panels.

Back to the original requester's question - I think the steel tanks from S, SF, SF2 (not GT) are all viable alternatives to his American Eagle fiberglass tank on an S frame to use till he decides he's going to get one made or some other approach.

I promise to stop beating this dead horse now.
 

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CLEMTOG

Hero member
there are at least ten different frame part numbers and different frames, maybe one or two more, differing mainly in the lower two tubes at the head stock and their simplification (hence cheaper) the width of the rails at the seat front, and the tube dropping to the swing arm pivot, straight drop or curved, (strangley would be dearer, not a move normally made by Massimo) many other minor details, the year of manufacture does more than the model type. The disc braked swing arms are the same part number as triples.
Simon Y show us a picture of your tank adaptions please. In some cases the tanks will fit but then the carbs wont (wrong type) then the tank can also skew the seat, which might fit on vertical prongs or on horizontal spades. A lot of people say ALL 750 frames are the same. They are not, far from it.
CLEM
 
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    • FUEL TANKS
The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 s.39 as amended (see link below)
All fuel tanks:
  • Shall be constructed and maintained so that the leakage of any liquid from the tank is adequately prevented.

  • Shall be constructed and maintained so that the leakage of vapour from the tank is adequately prevented.

  • If fitted to a vehicle first used on or after 1st July 1973:
- Made only of metal.
- Fixed in such a position and so maintained as to be reasonably secure from damage.
  • A two-wheeled motorcycle (with or without a side-car) first used on or after 1st February 1993 need not have a fuel tank made only of metal.
I believe it was Mr Bloor who got the law altered for the Hinckley Tiger 900
 

arancia

Full member
Location
Arizona, USA
"If fitted to a vehicle first used on or after 1st July 1973: - Made only of metal." so were 1974 750SFCs sold in the UK with fibreglass tanks?
 

motoddrob

Hero member
Location
S/W Australia
Polyester resin which is used for fibreglass is the problem when it comes to ethanol.
Epoxy resin which is used for carbon fibre is ethanol proof.
So if you have a fibreglass tank and use ethanol added fuel you really should line the tank preferably with a epoxy base liner like Casswells.
My SFC tank has survived as we don't have ethanol in fuel yet in WA. When it was on the east coast there were options for non ethanol fuel.
 

Paul Marx

Hero member
Location
France
"If fitted to a vehicle first used on or after 1st July 1973: - Made only of metal." so were 1974 750SFCs sold in the UK with fibreglass tanks?
Good question. Maybe they weren't sold for road use?
That was the case in France where they were never homologated so the importer sold them with SF documents.

My SFC has SFC documents but certainly the result of bribery or nepotism at the registration office.

Paul
 

CLEMTOG

Hero member
very few SFC 750's were officially sold and imported to the UK, might have been six, but one of them (that I know of) was sold new to Bob Hall who used it on the road. It had a fibreglass tank. Jota's and Monty's were sold in the hundreds for road use and the exhaust system was NEVER quiet enough to meet the required standards, but still sold and still registered, it says more about the UK registration system than anything else.
Plenty of cars these days, both petrol and diesel, have plastic tanks, it was the Americans who thought it a good idea to mount the tank between the axles rather than hanging out just under the rear bumper. Electric cars have their batteries housed in plastic, and have you seen how they can burn in a relatively slow speed collision that causes an electric short?
CLEM
 
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