The future?

sideshow

Hero member
try going around Oz on that.... I saw the interview they did with Triumph on 44 teeth, they said the desired range riders wanted was for 2 hours riding and then coffee and charging for 20 minutes..... looks cool, and the people involved are cool, but I think bikes need a longer ride time, that said it seems electric bikes may be the future, and could be fun
 

Gerald

Hero member
Electric vehicles will not work with todays lifestyle and demands until the battery problem is solved.
Beyond me why vehicles were not designed with easy, quick swap batteries, instead of the proposed recharging pods all over the place.
Parallel to selling fuel at filling stations, normed batteries could be provided to all vehicles on a swap out basis, eliminating the wait to recharge.

Gerald
 

sideshow

Hero member
Electric vehicles will not work with todays lifestyle and demands until the battery problem is solved.
Beyond me why vehicles were not designed with easy, quick swap batteries, instead of the proposed recharging pods all over the place.
Parallel to selling fuel at filling stations, normed batteries could be provided to all vehicles on a swap out basis, eliminating the wait to recharge.

Gerald
Im still holding out for hydrogen or some other sort of engine... also seems a huge waste, cost and problem to dispose of all the cars etc we have now , makes this picture partially true
1617109657206.png
 

Laverdalothar

Hero member
Location
Germany
well - I'd concur this with:


Now take into consideration that solar power is very often now used (at least in Germany) to produce electrics. Very often used in the outback of Australia, too, as there is enough free sun there everywhere, you could produce more electric power than you could ever use, and that environmental pollution free! All it takes is enough solar panels and some time to load the battery. But honestly - how many hours is your car f.e. unused? Time enough to recharge in 99% of all cases. For long distance drives, you could use either a different car (rented for a day or two or borrowed/exchanged with your neighbors) or simply plan the recharging stops as a refresher for yourself and have a cup of coffee (at least in areas where chargers are readily available).

The battery exchange is a logistic nightmare... a) you would need to have a standard on this - worldwide! absolutely impossible. Why should a city car carry batteries just like a long distance SUV? Makes no sense. b) you would need to have people available to help on the battery exchange if something goes wrong. And so on and so on....

Quicker Re-Charging is the better alternative I feel.
 
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Simonr501

Hero member
Location
Lympne, Kent. UK
Electric vehicles will not work with todays lifestyle and demands until the battery problem is solved.
Beyond me why vehicles were not designed with easy, quick swap batteries, instead of the proposed recharging pods all over the place.
Parallel to selling fuel at filling stations, normed batteries could be provided to all vehicles on a swap out basis, eliminating the wait to recharge.

Gerald
My thoughts precisely!
My idea is to drive over a pit, then disable the car and a robot extracts the depleted battery from underneath and inserts a fully-charged one (with a battery securing mechanism of course)!
All done and dusted in just a few seconds.
 

arancia

Full member
Location
Arizona, USA
My thoughts precisely!
My idea is to drive over a pit, then disable the car and a robot extracts the depleted battery from underneath and inserts a fully-charged one (with a battery securing mechanism of course)!
All done and dusted in just a few seconds.
Elon Musk tried to convince us that could be done in his 2013 on stage demo but it doesn't seem to have become reality yet.


While I can see great value in electric vehicles around town with overnight recharges, I like to be able to drive without stopping on the long, straight, boring trip from Phoenix to Los Angeles, needs a 650 km range minimum, when that becomes feasible in an EV and I can then recharge it quickly for the trip back, then I'll consider an EV. My gasoline powered vehicles have no problem on such a round trip with a five minute refill.
 

smlav

New member
Location
UK
I had a Zero on test for a day last year, very quick off the mark and fun to ride. But as soon as I set off I started worrying about range/charging. I’d want 250 mile range at realistic speeds.
 

Ian D

Hero member
Location
South Australia
Honda, Yamaha, KTM, and Piaggio, recently announced they are working together on what could become a industry wide specification for batteries.
eg. a common swap and go battery.

Will it work? :unsure:
 

TomL

New member
Location
Leiden
Honda, Yamaha, KTM, and Piaggio, recently announced they are working together on what could become a industry wide specification for batteries.
eg. a common swap and go battery.

Will it work? :unsure:
Nope.
By the time a standard is established both battery and charging tech will have evolved too much for that standard to be relevant...
That's the unavoidable phase in new tech development.
 

Legs

Hero member
Location
Adelaide Hills
Very often used in the outback of Australia, too, as there is enough free sun there everywhere, you could produce more electric power than you could ever use, and that environmental pollution free!
Ha ha! Here in Adelaide just about every house has a solar panel array, with a scheme that excess power produced by them is sold back into the grid.
So much power is produced on a hot sunny day that the grid can be overloaded and they have come up with a scheme that YOU have to pay to feed back to the grid.
They say this is to encourage everybody to install battery banks.
 

Gerald

Hero member
Apart from the issue with limited range and long waiting times at charching stations, I'd like to know how a typical problem on congested highways will be adressed. Here in Germany we frequently have accidents or weather conditions that bring traffic to a stop, causing large traffic jams . With standardized, quick swap batteries, a rescue vehicle can be sent to the stranded vehicles and swap the batteries out. Try recharching several dozen or hundreds of vehicles on a snowed in Autobahn in Winter....
 

rowdypat

Hero member
Location
Melbourne
Electric bike is like decaf tea, American beer, faux leather, Hale & Pace, two weeks in Skegness, golf - in fact it’s everything I’d hate.
:unsure: Dunno about that. I discovered some awesome American ales whilst holidaying in the US. Every town I visited had it's own locally brewed lovelies. :love:;)
 

Laverdalothar

Hero member
Location
Germany
Elon Musk tried to convince us that could be done in his 2013 on stage demo but it doesn't seem to have become reality yet.


While I can see great value in electric vehicles around town with overnight recharges, I like to be able to drive without stopping on the long, straight, boring trip from Phoenix to Los Angeles, needs a 650 km range minimum, when that becomes feasible in an EV and I can then recharge it quickly for the trip back, then I'll consider an EV. My gasoline powered vehicles have no problem on such a round trip with a five minute refill.

How often do you take that trip of 650km? For sure not every week, right? How many cars does your family have - for sure more than one. Why not starting with one EV and go from there?

And: how long does that 650km Trip take - and are you doing it without any breake for food, beverage or toilet time? With a fully charged wide-range Tesla you start with 500+km range. Assuming there is a super charger on the way, you take a cup of coffee, go for a pi and when you return, your car has recovered to at least 80% of the range. So - you could do roughly 800 - 900 km with a 20 minutes stop. Or simply half way between Phoenix and Los Angeles, take the 20 Minutes break. Not sure you could do that faster with a gas burner, as you simply NEED that break to stay focused and safe. If you plan it in, it is no problem at all. Just start 10 minutes earlier, cause that is the real time difference if you include the time you need to pay the gas, check oil etc on the gas burner...

Sorry to say it, but this becomes more and more an excuse rather than an argument. I am currently almost not driving a car, that is why I do not invest into one (and because the Model Y is still not produced in Germany and therefore, we can not test-ride it yet; else I would most probably already have ordered one...).

The reason why the battery exchange never happened is because Tesla recognized it is a logistic nightmare...
Apart from the issue with limited range and long waiting times at charching stations, I'd like to know how a typical problem on congested highways will be adressed. Here in Germany we frequently have accidents or weather conditions that bring traffic to a stop, causing large traffic jams . With standardized, quick swap batteries, a rescue vehicle can be sent to the stranded vehicles and swap the batteries out. Try recharching several dozen or hundreds of vehicles on a snowed in Autobahn in Winter....
Hi Gerald,
as written above: there is no way you can standardize these battery packs unless you standardize all cars. see how many different normal batteries exist for cars. how many different airfilters, spark plugs etc. etc. - what makes you believe the automobile industry could agree on a standard when they haven't achieved it in 150 years? You would need a truck load full of battery packs to achieve this. Also, why should a city car carry half a ton of batteries with it just because an SUV would need it? makes absolutely no sense.

The better way to help cars stranded at road side would be to have mobile chargers to be delivered to these cars that make them able to reach at least to the next charging station. just like when you run out of fuel, ADAC brings you 10 Liters (at a price...) to make you able to get to the next gas station. Or have recharging-possibilities at these emergency phones along the highway. or have inductive charging on the right lane of the highway... or.... Anything is better than the idea of changing batteries. It is simply logistically not something you could do in an economic way.
 
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sideshow

Hero member
Apart from the issue with limited range and long waiting times at charching stations, I'd like to know how a typical problem on congested highways will be adressed. Here in Germany we frequently have accidents or weather conditions that bring traffic to a stop, causing large traffic jams . With standardized, quick swap batteries, a rescue vehicle can be sent to the stranded vehicles and swap the batteries out. Try recharching several dozen or hundreds of vehicles on a snowed in Autobahn in Winter....
thats a bloody good point, I hadn't even have that idea enter my head
 

Laverdalothar

Hero member
Location
Germany
Electric bike is like decaf tea, American beer, faux leather, Hale & Pace, two weeks in Skegness, golf - in fact it’s everything I’d hate.
have you ridden one (for more than just around the block)? Think of it in the following application:
-my town is quite hilly. There is almost no place that you can reach to that does not include at least one bigger road going steeply upwards. Years ago, I had to commute to my office daily, which was 18km away. I tried this with my normal bike and reached the office below 1 hour, completely sweated through to the underwear. No chance to get a shower in the office. I tried the same distance with the e-bike. I was still feeling it took me afford to reach the office, but I was not completely sweated. Also, it saved me another 10 minutes on this distance.

-before I had the e-bike, I had hundreds of excuses not to take the bike. I ride WAY more on the bike since I have the e-bike.

-people with knee-problems, people that are untrained, older people (just like me... ;-) )benefit from the help of this e-motor a lot.

-I can now even keep up with friends that are very trained and we can have a tour of 30 - 40 kilometers without an issue.

Before you ask: my bike get's recharged by the solar system on the roof of my house... ;-)
 
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