The Perfect Corner Series

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XBCoupeJota

Guest
The Perfect Corner an Introduction

The Perfect Corner started off with CJ (who is responsible for my addiction to orange) and myself starting to film (with a mobile phone) some of our normal activities touring around on our Laverda's visiting friends, races, motorcycle shows and general get together's. We started off the series on YouTube to feature normal people enjoying there bikes no matter what type, brand etc. The show has also an underlying objective to promote Laverda's and expose more and more people particularly the next generation, who haven't heard of Laverda, to the marque.

We now have 21 episodes of The Perfect Corner and steadily our viewers have been increasing. We are always looking at ways to be inclusive of other clubs, brands, events etc in order to increase the exposure of Laverda. We would like to encourage the Laverda community throughout the world to get behind this series by supporting the videos when launched by commenting and rating and passing on to other motorcycle enthusiasts or just friends. It's pretty lighthearted fun with great music and we find lot's of non motorcyclists enjoy watching as well.

Presently there are two Series on YouTube (Series 1 is all in Australia and Series 2 Euro follows our recent amazing trip through Europe).

The Perfect Corner Euro 7 - Laverda Museum V6, which is an absolute must see for any Laverda enthusiast, especially those who have not been fortunate enough to visit Cor Dees Museum in Holland.

I hope you enjoy The Perfect Corner and it's promotion of Laverda motorcycles. If you have a YouTube channel of your own, then make sure you add OZLAVERDA as a friend to build up our community in that other cyberspace realm.

Cheers Crispin
http://www.youtube.com/OZLAVERDA

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Laverdalothar

Hero member
Location
Germany
Hi Crispin,

are you still in Europe? I guess no, but if you are - let me know. A) there is a great Laverda-Dealer not far away from the N?rburgring called OCT (Orange Cycle Team). Great guys, big spare-part store...

And: there is an area around called the "Bergisches Land" with tons of small windy roads, great biker restaurants, a large Laverda community etc. etc.

Let me know if you are still around or plan to come back. We get something organized for you that is worth being filmed... ;-)

keep on - great stuff you're doing!! ;-)
 

Gerald

Hero member
Crispin,

As always a fantastic video and CJ's comments are really entertaining. Just for the record, 2 rear view mirrors are not mandatory in Germany for any bike built before 1990, one suffices (German regulation STVZO ?56). So the folks at the N?rburgring have their own set of rules :police:.

Regards
Gerald
 

sfcpiet

Administrator
Staff member
Location
NRW, Germany
Crispin,

The N?rburgring is in effect probably the longest one-way street in the world!  As it is a public road, road rules are applicable.

But insisting on mirrors, escpecially on a bike registered in the UK, is a bit narrow-minded..........

piet
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
Hi Crispin

Last Sunday I rode with CJ from Hobart to the Ross Motorcycle Show. He was on Lino's RGS and I was riding my Benelli 900 Sei. I was reluctant to take the Jota because an intermittent electrical fault doesn't inspire confidence, and I didn't feel like being stranded on the side of the road. Anyway, CJ took some video footage as we were riding along. Assuming you get to edit his video at some stage, would you be able to send me a clip of the Benelli?

It won't be the most excitig bit of video as we were just cruising along the Midlands Highway at the time, but it would be nice to see and hear the Benelli from someone else's point of view. CJ reckons it sounds like a Kawasaki 2-stroke triple!

My email is cam.douglas(at)eftel.net.au

Cheers,
Cam
 

Robjota

Hero member
Location
England
Hi Crispin

What can I say, thanks, enjoyed seeing those memories relived....., that guy at the Cafe, what a friendly chap and an interesting life.
Hope to do it all again next year.
Cheers
Rob
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
Hi Crispin

I know the Aurora Australs well - done a few trips south on her myself, but not in recent years. I have heard her referred to as the "Orange Roughy" because of some weld buckling on the hull plates along the sides. No doubt Paul and/or John (chief and chef - both Laverda owners) gave CJ the guided tour. With those two among the crew, I wouldn't be surprised if someone paints a Laverda logo on the side!

Cheers,
Cam
 

Gerald

Hero member
Hi Crispin,

Great Video again, liked the editing with top view very much :p
Who's the artist doing the sountrack?

Regards,
Gerald
 
J

Jezebel

Guest
Hi Crispin,

really nice one again!

As for twisties Piet mentioned... I remember taking Steve on a trip around here where we had to stop as Steve was feeling nauseous and close to throwing up from all the twisties.
And, no, we did not have a big pissup the night before.
I think in terms of fantastic rides the place where I live now has quite a lot to offer. Just too far out of your way this year, but who knows.

Cheers
Christiane

 
J

Jezebel

Guest
Crispin,

If you consider Steve a "big drinker" you have never met one who really is. ::)
If you come to Austria you might drastically revise your picture  >:D

Am presently looking at writing an essay about brewing beer. No, not those rat-piss wannabe drinks you are occasionally confronted with Down Under - without stating any brand here :D - but "proper" beer.
In Bavaria - where I originally come from - a standard measure for a beer is the "Ma?" i.e. one full litre! And the "normal daily allowance" for a monk in a monastery - they were the first and best at brewing - was 5 Ma?. 5 litres of beer (approximately 15 stubbies!) was considered normal daily consumption, not "heavy drinking"!!
If you take into account that the beer in those days was around 8 to 12% alcohol (which means you should again double the number of stubbies >:D) you might get the picture. :D :D :D

Even today, when you go on the pilgrimage to visit the holy mountain of Andechs, one of the very last Monastery breweries, where the beer is somewhere between 6 and 8 % of alcohol, it is considered an offence if you are male and want a "Halbe" which is half a litre. Depending on whether the Monk is grumpy or not you might hear something like "Go and grow up and return when you're able to drink like a man" and not be served! The only concession they tend to make is if a woman wants a "small" beer which for Australian standards is still the size of two normal beers.

Of course you are welcome to Austria any time, I might be able to show you not only a few fantastic roads but also some proper Bavarian/Austrian culture :D

Cheers
Christiane

 
J

Jezebel

Guest
Aaah, OK!  :D
I knew about the "Bluey" but not that it is also applied to whatever other thing you want to express  :eek:

Bundy's not too bad, but it does not really work when you're actually thirsty and need to replenish lost fluid. Beer's much better here, as it also contains all the essential minerals, so basically a good isotonic sports drink  >:D
Never tried the OP so far, would be really interesting one day.
Presently I'm sort of on the waggon anyway with all those painkillers and stuff. :(

As for "expensive" :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
If anything is inexpensive in Bavaria it is beer!!
Slightly more expensive in Austria, but still quite affordable.
In Austria you can buy a case of 20 bottles, i.e. 10 litres, of really good stuff for an average of 12 - 14 ?, but you can already get really nice stuff starting at 7 ? a case!! With the present exchange rate that's somewhere in the 13 $ range!

Prost!

Christiane
 

sfcpiet

Administrator
Staff member
Location
NRW, Germany
Christiane,

Hop over the border to Czecho, used to buy crates of original Budvar Pilsener for around 7Pf(!)/bottle and import to Bavaria.  No achohol duties on that  :D :D :D, because beer is considered food there, as you obviously know.  Only slightly more expensive these days, around ?0.35/bottle!

Cheers,
piet
 
Christiane

Maybe it's different in Austria, but here in hot sweaty Florida (I used to work in Physiology at University of Florida, where Gatorade was patented), the general theory is that physiological isotonicity is severely compromised by the dehydrating effect of a 10% ethanol solution. While the simple sugar content of maltose in beer is not too far from isotonic, beer just doesn't have the mixture of inorganic salts necessary for proper replenishment.

On the other hand, it's a little-known fact (but nonetheless true...) that sugar cane has a series of salt pumps that maintain concentrations of various salts in the plant sap at concentrations very close to mammalian tissue fluids. This phenomenon seems to be even more prevalent in coastal Queensland, and most pronounced in the Bundaberg area. There is a theory that somehow, by a mechanism yet to be discovered, that some human DNA was incorporated into sugar cane in the Bundaberg region... but this is speculation. The hard scientific fact is that numerous double-blind studies have demonstrated that ingestion of drinks made from Queensland sugar cane produces test subjects who are smarter (p>0.1), better-looking (p>0.1), and more successful in life(P>0.05) than beer drinkers (especially beer produced north of the equator). The processes of fermentation and distillation seem to accentuate this phenomenon, although this requires further study.

And I know the tests were double-blind; the testers were drinking Bundy rum! Studies funded by grants from Colonial Sugar Refineries and the Queensland Sugar Growers Association.

Ken

 

Vince

Hero member
OP Bundy,I nearly missed the first  125cc GP at Philip Island because someone insisted that OP rum and coke was easier to carry during our wonders the night before,very very bad idea.
 

laverdakeith

Hero member
It is also a little known fact that a nice beer can greatly enhance the Laverda engine building experience........... ;)
 

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J

Jezebel

Guest
mcnicol said:
Christiane

Maybe it's different in Austria, but here in hot sweaty Florida (I used to work in Physiology at University of Florida, where Gatorade was patented), the general theory is that physiological isotonicity is severely compromised by the dehydrating effect of a 10% ethanol solution. While the simple sugar content of maltose in beer is not too far from isotonic, beer just doesn't have the mixture of inorganic salts necessary for proper replenishment.

On the other hand, it's a little-known fact (but nonetheless true...) that sugar cane has a series of salt pumps that maintain concentrations of various salts in the plant sap at concentrations very close to mammalian tissue fluids. This phenomenon seems to be even more prevalent in coastal Queensland, and most pronounced in the Bundaberg area. There is a theory that somehow, by a mechanism yet to be discovered, that some human DNA was incorporated into sugar cane in the Bundaberg region... but this is speculation. The hard scientific fact is that numerous double-blind studies have demonstrated that ingestion of drinks made from Queensland sugar cane produces test subjects who are smarter (p>0.1), better-looking (p>0.1), and more successful in life(P>0.05) than beer drinkers (especially beer produced north of the equator). The processes of fermentation and distillation seem to accentuate this phenomenon, although this requires further study.

And I know the tests were double-blind; the testers were drinking Bundy rum! Studies funded by grants from Colonial Sugar Refineries and the Queensland Sugar Growers Association.

Ken

Double blind from too much Methanol in the rum?  >:D :D :D
 

Dellortoman

Hero member
Mercaptanol acid? Sounds like a contradiction of terms. Mercaptanol is an alcohol and has a pH of about 8, making it slightly alkaline.
Perhaps you're thinking of of methyl mercaptan - one of the more smelly compounds of flatus (farts) :-X  That explains the interesting taste of Bundy :p

Cheers,
Cam
 
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